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Katrina: Un an apres!

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gwotoro
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Nombre de messages : 3974
Localisation : Canada
Date d'inscription : 20/08/2006

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Katrina: Un an apres! Empty Katrina: Un an apres!

Message  gwotoro Lun 28 Aoû 2006 - 20:14

Je vous propose un texte de Bill Quigley, sur la Nouvelle-Orleans un an apres Katrina.

Un autre point de vue sur certains "oublies" de la Nouvelle-Orleans. Rappelez-vous qu'on aux USA, le pays le plus riche du monde.

August 22 , 2006
Trying to Make It Home
New Orleans a Year After Katrina

By BILL QUIGLEY

New Orleans .


Bernice Mosely is 82 and lives alone in New Orleans in a shotgun double. On August 29, 2005, as Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, the levees constructed by the U.S. Corps of Engineers failed in five places and New Orleans filled with water.

One year ago Ms. Mosely was on the second floor of her neighborhood church. Days later, she was helicoptered out. She was so dehydrated she spent eight days in a hospital. Her next door neighbor, 89 years old, stayed behind to care for his dog. He drowned in the eight feet of floodwaters that covered their
neighborhood.

Ms. Mosely now lives in her half-gutted house. She has no stove, no refrigerator, and no air-conditioning. The bottom half of her walls have been stripped of sheetrock and are bare wooden slats from the floor halfway up the wall. Her food is stored in a styrofoam cooler. Two small fans push the hot air around.

Two plaster Madonnas are in her tiny well-kept front yard. On a blazing hot summer day, Ms. Mosely used her crutches to gingerly come down off her porch to open the padlock on her fence. She has had hip and knee replacement surgery. Ms. Mosely worked in a New Orleans factory for over thirty years sewing uniforms. When she retired she was making less than $4 an hour. “Retirement benefits?” she laughs. She lives off social security. Her house had never flooded before. Because of her tight budget tight, Ms. Mosely did not have flood insurance.

Thousands of people like Ms. Mosely are back in their houses on the Gulf Coast. They are living in houses that most people would consider, at best, still under construction, or, at worst, uninhabitable. Like Ms. Mosely, they are trying to make their damaged houses into homes.

New Orleans is still in intensive care. If you have seen recent television footage of New Orleans, you probably have a picture of how bad our housing situation is. What you cannot see is that the rest of our institutions, our water, our electricity, our healthcare, our jobs, our educational system, our criminal justice systems – are all just as broken as our housing. We remain in serious trouble. Like us, you probably wonder where has the promised money gone?

Ms. Mosely, who lives in the upper ninth ward, does not feel sorry for herself at all. “Lots of people have it worse,” she says. “You should see those people in the Lower Ninth and in St. Bernard and in the East. I am one of the lucky ones.”


Suite de l'article : http://www.counterpunch.org/quigley08222006.html

Presentation de l'auteur:
Bill Quigley is a human rights lawyer and law professor at Loyola University New Orleans. You can reach him at [url]Quigley@loyno.edu[/url]

For more information see www.justiceforneworleans.org

    La date/heure actuelle est Lun 5 Déc 2022 - 15:53